Meg Casey
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"Most Able Disabled"

Meg Casey's handicapped issues column


Meg Casey at Disneyland
Meg Casey on her trip visiting children with progeria in 1981
photo courtesy of the Casey family

Words and quotations of Meg Casey

  • This entire country was built upon people that didn't fit in somewhere in the world. People who had dreams for their lives that they refused to give up, so they came here to make them happen.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • They didn't wait for the gods to bridge the gaps for them. Some things you have to do for yourself.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • You are only as handicapped as you let yourself to be.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The most important person to accept who you are and what you are is yourself.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Take a good look at yourself from the outside and the inside. Keep what you like. Change what you don't like that can be changed and deal with the rest.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Enjoy each other now to the fullest and don't focus on the questionable tomorrow.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • If you worry about what is to come you will have wasted the time on hand and missed out on all of the joys found in the little details that make your memories so sweet.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • If you don't like something, say so. It's perfectly alright to get angry. but don't stay that way.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • A little body doesn't make a little person. On the other hand a big mouth doesn't make a little person any bigger or smarter, necessarily.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • One must learn to be assertive for oneself for one’s own respect and preservation.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Assertiveness is an art form, hard to be perfect.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I can introduce you to many so called "abnormal" people that have found more sunshine in their lives than so called "normal" people.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It's a wonderful world for anyone that wants it that way.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • How does anyone deal with his/her death announcement? You make it sound like someone is standing there with a stopwatch shouting the time at you as you race around on "the great track of life".
    Melodrama is not my speed, never mind dealing with death. How the hell do you deal with that sort of self-abusive attitude? The mere thought of existing under that kind of constant nagging pressure would drive me to shoot myself with the starter's pistol!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • If I'm going to be hit by a train I don't want to watch it! If I'm not going to be pulled out of the way in time, shut Up! I don't need any fortune teller describing my final scene and ruining every decent night's sleep until then. When my number is up, Dear Lord, make it quick!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Go out and tackle the world piece by piece until you have seen and experienced it all – each and every wonder. There are many more than you ever know and none should be attempted with a fearful spirit. Travel in the excitement of adventure and with the desire to be thrilled to your toes.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The wonders are still there for you to see and enjoy as you travel. In the face of the greatness of the people who managed to do marvelous things in history, you and I can surely manage to figure out how to take advantage of the most modern transportation systems of today.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • … coming to a slow boil while sitting on the back burner, and as always when heat is applied sooner or later something is going to burn - even stew.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I'm not a square, round, oval or triangle peg so I don't fit into any ready–made slot. I'm a different shape, the horse of a different color, the freak of genetics. I'm a puzzle, I'm medical history. I'm – unique!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It is essential in groups of citizens such as the disabled that each and every eligible voting member of the minority registers to vote.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Of course I feel self-conscious! But after 27 years of practicing the act, the lines have become so second nature to me that even I forget that it wasn't always this easy.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Handicapped people are just people with a handicap and are subject to the same differences in intelligence and personality as anyone else.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Not every disabled person has a chip on shoulder. Not every white person belongs to the KKK.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Handicapped people can be bastards too! It is our right to be deserving of a punch in the nose as the next guy!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I'm almost convinced that "Obnoxious and Dense" are two of the job requirements for city agencies and the social security department.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • No matter how well intentioned someone's intentions are you simply can't make another person live their life exactly the way that you'd like them to. All that you are entitled to is to get an ulcer are over worrying about it for them.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Whether my choices turned out to be the right or wrong ones, I was entitled to make my own whopping mistakes and to ignore or take outside advice.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • U.F.O. - Unexpected Fun Outing

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The metamorphosis in which a child changes from the squirming, squeaky bundle into a little independent person ready to make her very first decision and have an opinion, is pretty breathtakingly beautiful and so rapid it’s sad.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Some like to eat oysters, some like to pet them and everyone likes to wear them!.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Stand your ground and speak to the members of the press you want when you want to.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Every human being has suffered from "foot in mouth" disease during some god awful stage in their life. Some poor suckers are continually plagued by it. Put yourself in their shoes and be embarrassed for them.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • They want your vote. They need your vote. They will cater to you to get your vote and rightly they should.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Those prospective neighbors are frightened by ignorance. Their own ignorance of what exactly a person is like.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The ignorant soles of today are products of the societies throughout the ages who blindly continued to repeat mistakes and old customs of proceeding generations without ever known the justification of the actions they carried out. To many the unknown is terrifying.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Everyone has a fear of rejection as some time or another. It just may be that some of us are better at hiding our shakiness under the guise of an overly cocky beast.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • There are some really wonderful people in this world and they come in all shapes, colors and sizes.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I have a reaction to cats (called Keep’ematadistance).

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • A 16-year old female is at the frustrating age of being neither a little girl nor a woman and possibly feels under-appreciated, under-estimated and misunderstood.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Do not take it for granted that the person you're talking with knows more than you do; they may, in fact, know very little about. the particular issue you are discussing.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Your vote may seem small because of our ability to use it privately it seems no one counts it. But they do! Why else do you think all those campaign funds are spent just trying to sway your opinions on the issue of the day?

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Running ignorant people over with a wheelchair may sound like fun, but it will never pay off any positive benefits in the long run.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It is impossible to be middle class and handicapped today. You must be either very poor to live independently, or very rich. That's rich enough to afford an elevatored, pushbutton penthouse or able to buy yourself a human chain that can simply "pass you around through life."

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Human beings are funny things, like nuts (Some of us are nuts) Once I strip away the outer shell of the bodies and get down to the people inside I find that every one is mushy or nutty to some degree and hiding their own secret insecurities, many times even from themselves.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • A book was taken out of the library and given to me to read. Inside I found the pages to be filled with a collection of short swatches of someone’s thoughts!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I have never been filled with the burning insecurity that would make me feel I need to be cured. I don't feel that there is not there's there is anything wrong with the way I was made.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I see my image as I have always recognized myself.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I have learned many new lessons. the best of which was the difference between "want" and "foolish pride."

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It is amazing how deeply childhood hurts can scar personalities in the grown-up person. "Unfair" over attention to a seemingly undeserving brother or sister has caused hostilities that have started wars throughout history.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It is very easy to sit back and allow someone else to have his life circumstances hampered by needless obstacles. As long as we don't have to give up our time nor have to witness daily their struggles in dealing with the situations, which we helped to create or to perpetrate for their lifestyles.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Attitudinal barriers are perhaps the most painful. This simply means that they want to be accepted for what they are.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It can be very frightening to try and contemplate what life could be like for our children in the future. It is a constant job of reminding ourselves that when all is said and done, it will be "their own life."

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I asked God for all the things that I may enjoy Life: God gave me life that I like to enjoy all things.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I'm not sorry for myself; it wouldn’t do me any good if I were.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I've had a happier and fuller life than many "normal" people and I've learned to accept myself and to know my capabilities.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It's alright to strive for dreams; I can do anything if I set my mind to it.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • A curt word spoken can set your whole day off badly, so remember being an object of discrimination in some form can set your whole life off badly.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Of course I feel self-conscious, but after 27 years of practicing my act, the lines have become second nature to me and I even forget that it wasn't always easy. I am not a natural! I am well studied.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • There is no feeling in the world that quite compares with the one that comes over you as every head turns and all conversation stops upon your entrance. No one alive is oblivious to that dreaded pregnant pause. The trick is to appear unruffled in to say to yourself over and over again, “I'm a damn wonderful person!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The secret of her strength was that she was loved and she knew it. The secret of her family’s strength will be that she was loved, and they knew it.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I am a product of my environment. I come from a very large and proud Irish background. I was reared with a sense of pride in who I am and where I come from instilled in me and I'm honored to bear the family name.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The trick is to appear unruffled by the experience and never let the stuff register on your face. The people who are with you will take their cue from your conduct.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Some people suffer from a self-consciousness that comes across as hostility instead of a protective shield against hurt or embarrassment.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Curiosity is not wrong. Ignorance is.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Without curiosity a person can't learn. Unless a person learns he won't grow to expand his horizons to full potential.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • A person having to deal with the hardships of a disability are not given a special license to excuse them from exercising good manners.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • There is a difference between having a Christian attitude and setting one's self up as a sucker. To allow an obnoxious person to get away with stomping all over your rights and feelings is ridiculous.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • In this age of everyone fighting for their own equality, give people the respect everyone wants and let them feel your anger. Show them another facet of what the word equality means from person who practices it.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • If at first you don't succeed, storm the Bastille!.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Loneliness is no light matter. Solitary confinement can be as corrosive to the physical and mental health as any terminal disease. - (Everything not medically related falls under the benign umbrellas of a "social trip." - work, food shopping, classes, seeing your lawyer, etc.).

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • There are three types people on every dance floor. those who think everyone in the place is watching them, those who hope everyone in the place is watching them, and those who don't care who watches them.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The blind ignorance of continually repeating old mistakes because "that's the way it has always been done," without ever asking to understand the reasons why.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Everyone in a family is a affected by events which occur in their lives together.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Sometimes it seems as if you just get rid of one jerk and there's another. So you better get used to it because they'll always be barking somewhere.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Being given a game board. playing pieces and a disgustingly incomplete set of life instructions scares the hell out of many people.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Either find the way to deal with the public out of the depth of the love and pride you have in your child or take acting lessons.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Small children are very accepting of differences and for the most part find them desirable. I was "neat," never at a loss for a playmate.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Growing up, I was forced to wear awful clothes due to my small frame. (4 feet tall) Mickey Mouse and Winnie the Pooh are the bane of my existence. It is impossible to be alluring with a rodent all over your fancy panties and "jammies!"

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The echo of the death knoll deafens ears to all of the positive sounds in the statements like "You have six months to live, maybe more … I can't guarantee … " And they proceed to die for six months or more until the end and does come, possibly years later, but they have put themselves through such mental anguish on top of the physical discomfort worrying about what it is going to be like when it actually happens. They have also missed out on their last chances for joy and laughter, only to experience that misery.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • In the end whatever methods work to make coping with existence a little easier for you is your own business. As long it isn’t infringing on anyone else’s space in time, it's fine.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • If you feel inclined just try treating your attitude well instead of your ailments.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • "You can't fight City Hall." I come from a long line of City Hall Mud Wrestling Champions that runs in my family.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • The de-institutionalization of people with disabilities into a Group Home situation is no threat to public safety. No one unable to maintain him or her self in society would be put in jeopardy of having to deal with the rest of the crazy members of the society at large before he or she was emotionally and physically ready to deal with it. Nor will the conditions be contagious.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I want for you the Magic gift of keeping your heart young and your eyes open so that nothing beautiful shall ever escape you.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • It is my wish that you see the beauty in each day so that that the longer you live the more beautiful shall life become.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • I wish you all the realization that you have a heavenly gift that only God can give – a blank check for a brand-new day, 24 hours which you can filll in anyway you choose.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Most people do not fully appreciate the seriousness of the issue (of accessibility or inaccessibility) until they are personally inconvenienced by it in some way. Unfortunately it is usually a bit late by that point.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • Letter writing can afford to those who choose - the comfortable shield of anonymity - as well as the time to phrase your precise thoughts, doubts and fears perfectly and in as much detail as desired. … Meetings give the benefit of some form of instant response allowing an opportunity to catch a glimpse of the personality given away through body language and facial expressions.

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)
  • There is a sun shining outside somewhere, go out and find it!

    Meg Casey - handicapped advocate
    (1955 - 1985)

  • Milford Polished-Marble
    © 2015 to 2017 site design by Daniel Ortoleva
    photographs and other content courtesy of the Casey family unless noted
    blog posts and art by Meg Casey
    originally published 1982 to 1985 in the Milford Citizen newspaper
    Memorable Milford regrets that a political dispute has made it necessary to complete this project without the cooperation of a claimant to the original columns
    The original author disdained those only seeking to profit from tragedies.
    We did not feel that a disagreement should prevent the public from learning and enjoying these incredible pieces of advice and show they are still relevant to today.