Agrimony
Agrimony has a pleasant scent. It's medical properties helped purify blood & heal wounds.
Anise
Native to North America, the strong flavor of hyssop is of anise but is related to mint with bunched purple flowers. Anise hyssop goes well in soup, salads and pork. It can loosen up chest congestion or to attract bees.
True anise is from the Middle East and used to flavors baked goods & liqueurs. Aniseed tea reputedly aids indigestion & diarrhea.
Autumn Jay
Autumn Joy (Sedum), sometimes spelled as Autumn Jay, was brought from Europe by colonists as a stone crop that thrives among rocks. Stonecrop's dried leaves are a pepper alternative.
Autumn Joy
Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Basil
Originally from India, basil was once used to draw poison from bites. There are 2 varieties, sweet & bush basil. Sweet basil is believed to repel flies. Basil tea was used to assist gastric upsets & colds. Basil in tomato dishes did not become popular until around the 1700s because they are members of the nightshade family and were originally considered poisonous. Originally small tomatoes were used as tabletop decorations by the Europeans.
Bay
Native to the Mediterranean, bay was used since Roman times as garlands to honor noteworthy people & believed to ward off evil. Its is widely used in cooking including as bouquet garni or in marinades, stocks, stews & soup.
Bee Balm
Bergamot is a native plant with scented leaves & flowers sometimes called Bee Balm for attracting bees. Bergamot's minty flavor helped treat colds or to scent hand cream. Indians & Colonists relaxed with its tea which the colonialists switched to after the Boston Tea Party.
Black Eyed Susan
Varieties of coneflowers include the orange Black Eyed Susan & the purple coneflower, Echinacea Purpurea, better known as Echinacea used since colonial times up until today to boost immunity.
Rudbeckia Indian Summer
A popular Black-Eyed Susan is Indian Summer (Rudbeckia).
Borage
Borage came from the Mediterranean. The blue and white flowers may be candied. The leaves add a cucumber flavor to salads. Brewed, borage makes the mind glad.
Butterfly Weed
Also known as Pleurisy Root, it is noted for being a butterfly magnet, hence its name of Butterflyweed. It blooms through out the summer until mid fall.
Silverbells
Carolina Silverbells are a decorative small tree that is neither native to New England or the states of North and Souuth Carolina but to the Gulf coast.
chives
Chives are not a true herb but related to onions coming from China. Once used as a poison antidote & to stop bleeding.
comfrey
Native to Asia & Europe, comfrey sooths coughs & back problems. It healed wounds & broken bones which gave it the nick-name of knot-bone. Can be made into wine. Goes well with eggs dishes or in salads. Comfrey helped digestion &chest complaints. When mixed with witch hazel was used in cosmetics as a skin tonic.
Coral Bells
Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
costmary
Alecost is another name for costmary & refers to its use to flavor ale. Spicy and sweet smelling Another name is Bible Leaf when used as a nibble in church. Used in a potpourri to line drawers and chests.
Crassula Argentea
Crassula Argentea is commonly called Jade plant.
Dahlia
The tuber roots of the Dahlia were eaten by the Axtecs in Mexico.
Dandelion
The common weed dandelion's colonial medical uses were for rheumatism, the liver & as a blood purifier. Beverages include tea, wine or toasting the roots for a coffee substitute. Today it is served as a trendy and nutritious green salad. Chickweed like dandelion is considered a weed or once served in salads, brewed into a tea or eaten. It also was used as an ointment.
Dandelion
The common weed dandelion is served today as a trendy and nutritious green salad.
Dill
Looking similar to fennel, dill came from the Mediterranean and flavors vinegar, pickles, soups, fish & cabbage. It was used as a cure for insomnia & a "windy belly" otherwise known as flatulence.
Native to southern Europe, fennel & its seeds are delicious with soup & fish or in marinades. It helps keep insects & witches at bay. Fennel could be used as an eye lotion. It was believed that the leaves & seeds had healing properties. It suppresses hunger & was used for slimming (weight reduction).
Onion
Egyptian Onion - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Evening Primrose
Evening Primrose - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Feverfew
Various parts of this Colonial aspirin used for insect bites, fever, toothache and worms. Its effectiveness has been confirmed by modern research showing that it can treat migraines. The flowers dry well.
Foxglove
Once used for lung and liver complaints, today, foxglove is used to stimulate the heart. Toxic to children and animals.
Garlic Chive
Garlic Chive - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Goatsbeard
Goatsbeard Aruncus was used as a salve.
Goldenrod
Goldenrod root was used to treat tootaches and was used for dyeing fabric.
Gomphena with Dragonfly and Butterfly
Gomphena (Globe Amaranth) attracts Dragonflies and Butterflies.
Ladys Mantle
Dew gathered from the leaves of Lady's Mantle helped to improve the complexion especially sensitive skin. A tea was used to stop internal bleeding & cramping.
Lambs Ear
The soft leaves of Lamb's Ear were used to bandage wounds and help stop the flow of blood. Dried, they were taken as a tea.
Purple and White Lavender
Lavender has been used since Roman times to scent bath water & freshen clothes. Once used for headache & faintness. Today used in soaps, oils & potpourri sachets for fragrance. Lavender flowers can be purple, blue or white.
Lemon Verbena
Hailing from Chile, lemon verbena is not closely related to verbena or vervain. Flavors lemon sauces, fruit drinks & compotes. Used for scented soap & potpourri. Verbena attracts butterflys.
Lovage
Lovage leaves add a celery flavor to salad, soup and stew. •Lovage was an all-purpose medicine used for eye ailments & freckles. The root, dried & ground, helped "inward disease." or digestion. Added to baths it helped as a body deodorant or as a perfume was considered a love potion
Lungwort
Lungwort - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Mandeuilla Splendens
The native range of the decorative Mandeuilla Splendens is from the Southern United States to South America.
Calendula
Calendula or marigolds are members of the daisy family.
Marigold
Marigolds are believed to have originated in India. A syrup of petals was believed to give strength to the heart. Reputed to improve skin tone, aid digestion & heal wounds. Dried petals add flavor & a bright color to soups and stews.
milkweed
Native Americans sweetened foods with milkweed.
Peppermint
Originating from the East through North Africa. A strewing herb in homes, churches & dirty streets, & rubbed on teeth to clean them. Peppermint aids digestion & is served with lamb, peas, & fruit. Fresh in scent, it is used in potpourri & as a skin cleanser.
Spearmint
Peppermint, spearmint & apple or bowles mint are common varieties with some disagreement whether pennyroyal & bergamot are mints. Used with lamb, peas, & fruit. Is used in potpourri. Spearmint (pictured) flavors mint juleps.
Peppermint
Seasonal leaves, Mushrooms, Japanese Knot Weed, Goldenrod, Viburnam berry, Bedstraw root, Black Walnut, Olives, Sumac berries, Elder berries and Avacado are plants used for dyeing.
Nastusium
Originating from Peru, nasturtium flowers & buds can be served in salads while the leaves add a hot pepper flavor. The roots help repel burrowing insects.
Parsley
Parsley falls into either curly or flat leafed varieties & is native to the Mediterranean. Parsley flavors savoury dishes & the tea makes for a diuretic. Parsley could be used in an eye lotion or a dandruff shampoo to thicken hair.
Yale Ivy
poison Ivy with English Ivy in background.
Yale Ivy
English Ivy was imported to decorate Yale buildings.
Purple Coneflower Echinacea
Butterflies like to rest on top of coneflowers. Varieties of coneflowers include the orange Black Eyed Susan & the purple coneflower, Echinacea Purpurea, otherwise known as Echinacea used since colonial times up until today to boost immunity.
Red Choke Cherry
The Red Choke Cherry helped stomach aches and colds.
Rose Campion
Rose Campion - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Rosemary
Originating in the Mediterranean, rosemary was used in colonial times for colds, headaches, insomnia & indigestion. Beauty uses included perfumes, skin conditioner & a shampoo to darken hair. Serve with lamb, chicken, veal, fish & salad.
Rue
Rue, native to the Mediterranean, can be used sparingly in salad dressings. Bruised leaves were used for gout and stiffening joints. In ale, it prevented nightmares. It can cause a skin rash.
Sage
Sage has anti-inflamatory properties.
Santolina
Santolina - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Soapwort
A soap substitute can be extracted from soapwort leaves or its root, hence its name. This mild soap was ideal for giving a sheen to delicate fabrics such as silk.
Strawflowers
Strawflowers - Many herbs were used by the colonialists and native American Indians for flavoring of meals, medicine and the coloring of fabric are grown alongside their homes.
Summer Phlox
Summer Phlox attracts butterflies.
Sunflower with Bee
Sunflower with Bee brightens up a garden.
Sweet Autumn
Sweet Autumn is native to Japan.
Sweet Shrub
decorative Sweet Shrub can be found in woodlands.
Tansy
Tansy grows wild in America & Europe. Tansy cakes were baked from its leaves combined with mint, currents & sugar for an Easter treat, The tea is very spicy. It was used to cure worms or end pregnancies. It was used to fade freckles.
Thistle
Thistle
Thistle Flower
Thistle Flower
Creeping Thyme
A large aromatic family, used for colds, worms or digestive problems, headaches and as a disinfectant. Dried thyme can be used as potpourri. Excellent in many foods & teas. Thyme tea helped insomnia. Thyme helped clear up skin conditions.
English Thyme
Used for colds, worms or digestive problems, headaches and as a disinfectant. Dried thyme can be used as potpourri. Excellent in many foods & teas. Other thyme varieties of this large aromatic family include the flavorful orange thyme & lemon thyme which is a creeping thyme.
Sweet Woodruff
Woodruff was an ingredient in many summer drinks & to boost one's mood. It was used to repel insects from clothes. Milford's Woodroof family sold seeds of this herb.
yarrow
Since the Battle of Troy, yarrow was called woundwort for its use to stop bleeding, ease pain & infection. It was considered a good cleanser for oily skin. It was a general tonic to treat fevers. Chewed, it helped toothache & was tried as a baldness cure. Today the dried yellow or cream colored flowers are used in bouquets.
White, Yellow and Red Yarrow
Since the Battle of Troy, yarrow was called woundwort for its use to stop bleeding, ease pain & infection. It was considered a good cleanser for oily skin. It was a general tonic to treat fevers. Chewed, it helped toothache & was tried as a baldness cure. Today the dried yellow or cream colored flowers are used in bouquets.


Colonial clothes were dyed with herbs & flowers

colonial lacing
laced clothing
History is not limited to a time when women's dresses were longer than the men's pants. Colonial clothing had different fasteners, the modern zipper is less than 100 years old. Colonial era pants had buttons in the front. They and dresses had laces in the back to adjust the size. Belts and buckle were decorative items on hats and shoes.

Not all early New England settlers were Puritans wearing black, some colonialists sported a variety of clothing colors from yellows and blues to deep maroon. Colonial gardens grew herbs or flowers for use in medicine and dying clothes. Green faded easily requiring dye combinations of clay and plants often involving several dunkings to achieve a desired color.



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